Difference between revisions of "Chiptune"

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Broadly a '''chiptune''', also known as '''chip music''' or '''8-bit music''' is a piece of [[electronic music]] produced by using [[sound chip]]s that were used in in home computer, game consoles or arcade machines popular in the 1980s into the 1990s.<ref name="pp">''[http://www.zenpho.co.uk/PhillPhelps-ChiptuneSynth.pdf A modern implementation of chiptune synthesis]'' by Philip Phelps</ref><ref>''[https://archive.is/20140620104428/http://www.djz.com/news/best-chiptune-8bit-music-artists/ Top 5 Chiptune Artists]'' by Ian Friedman</ref><ref>''[http://journal.transformativeworks.org/index.php/twc/article/view/96/94 Endless loop: A brief history of chiptunes]'' by Kevin Driscoll and Joshua Diaz, Transformative Works and Cultures, Vol. 2, 2009</ref>
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Broadly a '''chiptune''', also known as '''chip music''' or '''8-bit music''' is a piece of [[electronic music]] produced by using [[sound chip]]s that were used in in home computer, game consoles or arcade machines popular in the 1980s into the 1990s.<ref name="pp">''[http://www.zenpho.co.uk/PhillPhelps-ChiptuneSynth.pdf A modern implementation of chiptune synthesis]'' by Philip Phelps</ref><ref>''[https://archive.is/20140620104428/http://www.djz.com/news/best-chiptune-8bit-music-artists/ Top 5 Chiptune Artists]'' by Ian Friedman</ref><ref>''[http://journal.transformativeworks.org/index.php/twc/article/view/96/94 Endless loop: A brief history of chiptunes]'' by Kevin Driscoll and Joshua Diaz, Transformative Works and Cultures, Vol. 2, 2009</ref> In spite of often being called "8-bit music", a chiptune can also refer to music made on computers with other bitsizes, such as 16-bit music.
 
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== See also ==
 
== See also ==

Revision as of 23:49, 2 October 2019

Broadly a chiptune, also known as chip music or 8-bit music is a piece of electronic music produced by using sound chips that were used in in home computer, game consoles or arcade machines popular in the 1980s into the 1990s.[1][2][3] In spite of often being called "8-bit music", a chiptune can also refer to music made on computers with other bitsizes, such as 16-bit music.

References

  1. ^ A modern implementation of chiptune synthesis by Philip Phelps
  2. ^ Top 5 Chiptune Artists by Ian Friedman
  3. ^ Endless loop: A brief history of chiptunes by Kevin Driscoll and Joshua Diaz, Transformative Works and Cultures, Vol. 2, 2009

Further reading

External links

Videos

Musicians