Difference between revisions of "James Husted"

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<!-- add dates -->'''James Husted''' is a designer and co-founder of [[Synthwerks]]. In the early 1970s he studied fine art and drafting at Western Washington University. For course credits he managed the synthesizer studio, which had an [[Arp 2500]], and taught the hardware aspects. After graduating he sold recording equipment and synthesizers, and taught electronic music at The Electronic Music Box, Seattle's only synth store. For about 25 years after that, and for over 60 products he was the graphics department at [http://www.symetrix.co/ Symetrix Inc]. There he was involved in every aspect of manufacturing from [[PCB etching]] and drilling, [[screen printing]], [[front panels|panels]], assembly and stock control. He then was the graphic designer at Digital Harmony Technologies Inc, followed by 9 years at Mackie.<ref name="em">[http://www.electronicmusic.com/features/interview/synthwerks.html#sthash.hBy8na1n.dpuf Synthwerks Interview] by Paul Clark, ElectronicMusic.com, Jan. 2010</ref><ref name="pnw">[http://www.aes-media.org/sections/pnw/mtg_notices/jun2005.pdf June Meeting Notice - Virtual Synths], AES PNW Section, 4 June 2005</ref><ref name="bm">''Beyond Mastering: A Conceptual Guide'' by Steve Turnidge, Hal Leonard Corporation, Sep 2013, ISBN 1-4584-7451-8</ref>
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<!-- add dates -->'''James Husted''' is a designer and co-founder of [[Synthwerks]]. In the early 1970s he studied fine art and drafting at Western Washington University. For course credits he managed the synthesizer studio, which had an [[Arp 2500]], and taught the hardware aspects. After graduating he sold recording equipment and synthesizers, and taught electronic music at The Electronic Music Box, Seattle's only synth store. For about 25 years after that, and for over 60 products he was the graphics department at [http://www.symetrix.co/ Symetrix Inc]. There he was involved in every aspect of manufacturing from [[PCB etching]] and drilling, [[screen printing]], [[front panels|panels]], assembly and stock control. He then was the graphic designer at Digital Harmony Technologies Inc, followed by 9 years at Mackie.<ref name="em">[http://www.electronicmusic.com/features/interview/synthwerks.html#sthash.hBy8na1n.dpuf Synthwerks Interview] by Paul Clark, ElectronicMusic.com, Jan. 2010</ref><ref name="pnw">[http://www.aes-media.org/sections/pnw/mtg_notices/jun2005.pdf June Meeting Notice Virtual Synths], AES PNW Section, 4 June 2005</ref><ref name="bm">''Beyond Mastering: A Conceptual Guide'' by Steve Turnidge, Hal Leonard Corporation, Sep 2013, ISBN 1-4584-7451-8</ref>
   
His first synth was a [[EMS VCS3]] in 1974. He was in many early electronic music groups in the Seattle area. Later he modified a few [[Oberheim SEM]] based systems. His explorations were slowed down by the trend towards single keyboard units and the move to [[digital]], until he found out about [[Eurorack|Eurorack modular synths]] and decided to start Synthwerks making [[modules|synthesizer modules]].<ref name="em" /><ref name="pnw"/><ref name="bm"/>
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His first synth was a [[EMS VCS3]] in 1974. He was in many early electronic music groups in the Seattle area. Later he modified a few [[Oberheim SEM]] based systems. His explorations were slowed down by the trend towards single keyboard units and the move to [[digital]], until he found out about [[Eurorack|Eurorack modular synths]] and decided to start Synthwerks making [[modules|synthesizer modules]].<ref name="em" /><ref name="pnw" /><ref name="bm" />
   
 
== See also ==
 
== See also ==

Revision as of 17:05, 3 May 2017

James Husted is a designer and co-founder of Synthwerks. In the early 1970s he studied fine art and drafting at Western Washington University. For course credits he managed the synthesizer studio, which had an Arp 2500, and taught the hardware aspects. After graduating he sold recording equipment and synthesizers, and taught electronic music at The Electronic Music Box, Seattle's only synth store. For about 25 years after that, and for over 60 products he was the graphics department at Symetrix Inc. There he was involved in every aspect of manufacturing from PCB etching and drilling, screen printing, panels, assembly and stock control. He then was the graphic designer at Digital Harmony Technologies Inc, followed by 9 years at Mackie.[1][2][3]

His first synth was a EMS VCS3 in 1974. He was in many early electronic music groups in the Seattle area. Later he modified a few Oberheim SEM based systems. His explorations were slowed down by the trend towards single keyboard units and the move to digital, until he found out about Eurorack modular synths and decided to start Synthwerks making synthesizer modules.[1][2][3]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Synthwerks Interview by Paul Clark, ElectronicMusic.com, Jan. 2010
  2. ^ a b June Meeting Notice – Virtual Synths, AES PNW Section, 4 June 2005
  3. ^ a b Beyond Mastering: A Conceptual Guide by Steve Turnidge, Hal Leonard Corporation, Sep 2013, ISBN 1-4584-7451-8

External links