Difference between pages "Jumper wire" and "Ken Stone"

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==Biography==
[[File:C4128_large_jumper_wires_20cm_m-f_pack_10.jpg|thumb|right|200px|Male to female jumper wire strip]]
 
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Ken is an over-enthusiastic synth hobbyist who started dabbling when modular synthesizers were both rare and expensive. His initial exposure to them was in 1974 when he heard the album "Popcorn" by Electric Coconut. Not long after that, the traveling music teacher brought his newly acquired Minimoog to school.
[[File:Jumper Wires with Crocodile Clips.jpg|thumb|right|200px|Jumper wires with crocodile clips, aka test leads.]]
 
[[File:Arduino_Breadboard_ATmega328P_USB2Serial.jpg|thumb|right|200px|A ribbon cable connects the pin sockets of an Arduino USB 2 Serial micro to a breadboard and wire jumpers make interconnections on the breadboard.]]
 
A '''jumper wire''' also known as '''jumper link''', '''jumper''', '''jump wire''' or '''DuPont cable''' is a connecting wire, bare at the ends or terminated with some type of connector. These are used in prototyping, installed as part of the circuit assembly, added after assembly to modify a circuit or added to correct a defect.<ref name="ctc">[http://www.circuitrework.com/guides/6-1.html 6.1 Jumper Wires], Circuit Technology Center</ref>
 
   
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It would be several years before Ken was able to get a synth of his own. In the mean time, DIY electronics was the only way he could produce any sound-makers. It wasn't until December 1980 that he was able to convince his father to buy him one, and even then, it was a very minimal system – modular, of course. That synthesizer was a Roland System 100M modular, specifically, one 110 VCO-VCF-VCA module, one 140 2 ENV-LFO, one 191J 5 module system rack, and the 181 49 keyboard controller. The only way to fill the gaps in the 191J was DIY. Unfortunately, back in those days, information was scarce and key parts were impossible to find.
== Use in prototyping ==
 
Jumper wires of insulated 26[[American wire gauge|AWG]] wire terminated with [[crimping|crimped]] pins or sockets in plastic housing are used to make connections between [[pin headers]] or sockets. With 2.5 mm (0.1 inch) housing they're suitable for interfacing single board computers like the [[Arduino]] and [[Raspberry Pi]]. These will also fit without damage to interconnect the components on solderless [[breadboard]] although here 22 AWG solid-core hookup wire with bare ends can be used instead.<ref>[https://www.rapidonline.com/jumper-wires-for-breadboard-arduino-raspberry-pi-olimex-etc-544268 Jumper Wires for Breadboard, Arduino, Raspberry Pi, Olimex, etc.], Rapid Electronics</ref>
 
   
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Fast forwarding to the late 1990s, Ken discovered other modular synth fans on the internet, and was soon offering the fruits of his DIY hobby to others, in the form of a web site that detailed his projects, and for those who were interested, PCBs for them as well. His intention was to help others build their own synths.
== Use in repair/modification ==
 
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As his own synth grew, so did his web site, and the number of designs available.
''See [[Repairs]] and [[PCB repair]]''
 
   
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A number of times after designing what he thought was a new and innovative module he would discover it had already been done before, by [[Serge Tcherepnin]].
== DuPont crimp connectors ==
 
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After that he looked closer at Serge Systems and liked what he saw, adopting the form factor for his own PCBs.
A DuPont crimp consists of two parts, 0.1” (2.54mm) housing and separate metal crimp terminal. The AWG for wire generally used is 22, 24, 26 or 28 (standard ribbon cable) and a maximum diameter of 1.57mm.<ref>Molex data sheet [http://www.molex.com/webdocs/datasheets/pdf/en-us/0008500114_CRIMP_TERMINALS.pdf 08-50-0114]</ref><ref>Molex data sheet [http://www.molex.com/webdocs/datasheets/pdf/en-us/0008520072_CRIMP_TERMINALS.pdf 08-52-0072]</ref>
 
   
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Serge Tcherepnin was contacted, and soon, by agreement, Serge's designs were also being made available to DIYers again.
Using the proper crimping tool makes a good crimp joint easy. A properly crimped joint does not need soldering and is more than strong enough.<ref>[http://renoirsrants.blogspot.co.uk/search/label/Crimping Crimping], by Dave Renoir, 20 October 2011</ref> Most crimp terminals are designed to be crimped, not soldered. Soldering a crimped terminal may weaken the mechanical connection, reduce electrical conductivity, and damage the terminal. As a general rule, you should not solder a crimp terminal.<ref>[https://web.archive.org/web/20150510074927/http://www.virginiawind.com/tips/060801_02.asp Making the Connection: Solder vs. Solderless Terminals] by Jerry Sussman</ref>
 
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While Ken is more often involved with the electronics in his synthesizers than actually producing music, he has been known to publicly share the occasional recording.
 
== See also ==
 
* [[Wire link]]
 
* [[Jumper]]
 
* [[Hook-up wire]]
 
 
== References ==
 
{{reflist}}
 
 
== External links ==
 
* [https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=376971.0 FYI Making DuPont jumper wires.], Arduino Forum, Feb 2016
 
* [https://electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/179179/what-is-the-official-name-for-these-jumper-wires/179183#179183 What is the official name for these jumper wires?], StackExchange EE
 
=== Suppliers ===
 
* [http://www.mouser.co.uk/Tools-Supplies/Prototyping-Products/Jumper-Wires/_/N-bkrh0 Mouser]
 
* [https://www.digikey.com/products/en/prototyping-products/jumper-wire/640 Digi-Key]
 
* [https://www.rapidonline.com/jumper-wires-for-breadboard-arduino-raspberry-pi-olimex-etc-544268 Rapid]
 
 
[[Category:Connectors]]
 
[[Category:Prototyping]]
 

Revision as of 05:02, 2 June 2016

Biography

Ken is an over-enthusiastic synth hobbyist who started dabbling when modular synthesizers were both rare and expensive. His initial exposure to them was in 1974 when he heard the album "Popcorn" by Electric Coconut. Not long after that, the traveling music teacher brought his newly acquired Minimoog to school.

It would be several years before Ken was able to get a synth of his own. In the mean time, DIY electronics was the only way he could produce any sound-makers. It wasn't until December 1980 that he was able to convince his father to buy him one, and even then, it was a very minimal system – modular, of course. That synthesizer was a Roland System 100M modular, specifically, one 110 VCO-VCF-VCA module, one 140 2 ENV-LFO, one 191J 5 module system rack, and the 181 49 keyboard controller. The only way to fill the gaps in the 191J was DIY. Unfortunately, back in those days, information was scarce and key parts were impossible to find.

Fast forwarding to the late 1990s, Ken discovered other modular synth fans on the internet, and was soon offering the fruits of his DIY hobby to others, in the form of a web site that detailed his projects, and for those who were interested, PCBs for them as well. His intention was to help others build their own synths. As his own synth grew, so did his web site, and the number of designs available.

A number of times after designing what he thought was a new and innovative module he would discover it had already been done before, by Serge Tcherepnin. After that he looked closer at Serge Systems and liked what he saw, adopting the form factor for his own PCBs.

Serge Tcherepnin was contacted, and soon, by agreement, Serge's designs were also being made available to DIYers again. While Ken is more often involved with the electronics in his synthesizers than actually producing music, he has been known to publicly share the occasional recording.